Our fishing culture

It is not known when the story of Norway's fisheries started, but the Norwegian fisherman has existed as long as there has been life along the coast of Norway. For Norwegians, fishing is a craft – one that has taken millennia to perfect. 

The coast has shaped the character of the Norwegian people. As many as 90 % of the inhabitants of this extended country live on the coast, and for the fishermen their life has been a struggle between the rough weather and the urge to go out fishing. As the Norwegians say, “The Sea gives and the Sea takes”. They have always had to struggle with the sea to reap its harvest.

We have been fishing for pelagic fish for more than 1000 years and we’ve gathered a unique body of knowledge about the species. It is a relationship of mutual dependency; the sea cares for us, so we must care for it. Nature has given us the best pelagic species and we see it as our duty to preserve and share this gift. 

Illustration: Hands holding a fish

Nature has given us the best pelagic species and we see it as our duty to preserve and share this gift.

We have been fishing for pelagic fish for more than 1000 years and we’ve gathered a unique body of knowledge about the species.

Infographic three people

90% of the inhabitants live on the coast.

Country of character

For all its unparalleled beauty, Norway’s cold climate has created a landscape that was historically difficult to farm, and the sparse settlements and tough conditions have contributed to the national character of Norwegians. The larger towns are becoming increasingly dominant up and down the country, but many of the rural values have survived the transference to the towns.
 
At first glance, Norwegians may be perceived as shy or reserved. But this seemingly indifferent façade often hides warm and sincere people who value ethics, honesty and generosity more than anything else. There is a light-hearted side to the Norwegian character, which comes to the fore on 17th of May (Norway's Constitution Day), when the entire nation dresses in red, white and blue to celebrate their beloved country. Then, in Haugesund (Norway) in August, there is the world´s longest “herring-buffet”. The feast is created by professional chefs and served to people free of charge. There are lots of activities for children, as well as herring dishes made especially for kids.

The harbour in a fishing village

评判社会影响

挪威可持续海产品的成功不仅在于其获得的利润,还在于其对他人以及整个世界带来的好处,这一点十分重要。研究表明渔业和水产业的增长,能够为更多的社区提供劳动机会和收入。

Graph showing the social impact of the Norwegian seafood industry

信息来源:挪威皇家科学院 https://www.sintef.no/en/

进一步造福经济

Fisherman in a boat

Fisherman in a boat

就业水平和国民生产总值(GNP)都会对挪威海产品产业造成影响。根据挪威皇家科学院的信息,海产品产业在2009年创造了将近42000个劳动年,其中超过18000的劳动年都是乘数效应的成果。

来源:2013年挪威海产品协会市场报告

Protecting the industry

Norway is a small, but proud country in the extreme north of the world. The stubbornness, spirit and passion of the people have put the country in one of the top positions within maritime industries. Oil and gas, shipping and fisheries are today cornerstones of Norwegian society – all due to the riches of the sea and the entrepreneurial spirit of Norwegians.
 
Fishing in Norway is a question of survival. Fishing is craftsmanship. Fishing is living in harmony with nature. Fishing in Norway equals developing new technologies. Fishing in Norway is about looking ahead.